Artworks > Created Compost @ The Alice

Ballerina
foil on canvas
8 x 10"
1974
Blue glassine with Cloud painting
Acrylic, glassine, quilt backing, shear polyester, wood supports
variable
2017
Cloud painting
Quilt backing, shear polyester, wood supports
10 x 12"
2017
Pride of crows
Acrylic, glassine, foil bags, ribbon, pins
approximately 12 x 6' variable
2017
Fishtail and Polka Dots
Acrylic, ink on linen table cloth. Dots: Acrylic, repurposed fabric, newspaper.
28 x 25 x 14"
2017
Sophie Selfie-blue
Silkscreen print on cotton
34 x 62"
2017
Untitled (small)
Acrylic, ink on terry cloth, wood supports, cork
10 x 13.5"
2017
Finicky Cat
Acrylic on plastic, wood supports
10 x 12"
2016
Sophie Selfie-pink
Silkscreen print on satin
6 x 3'
2017
Him and Her
Acrylic, ink, repurposed fabrics, pins, stick, can
approximately 8 x 8', variable
2017

‘A show of new work made from reclaimed fabrics, found images, glassine, and a couple painted sticks’.

Our American dream applauds those who can make all of the right moves, take the tough decisions, get the job done. However, for the rest of us, our everyday worlds are increasingly a hyper-normalization of immediacy, confusion and obfuscation. Our mediums tell us what to know and what to understand, but not how to act. We watch, we pause, consider, yet still we cannot decide.

This modern specter of indecision hovers over Julie Alexander’s richly varied compositions, a shadow suspended between the one and the other. Her work, - modest, layered and richly colored, careful in its carelessness - takes this crisis of determination and weaves it into a meditation on the means of deciding.

If our everyday existence, if our every artwork, is made up of thousands of immediate decision points - go left, turn right, place this here, that there, make this mark, sew this color - then Julie’s work keeps those decision points open, floating in the slight spring breeze from the door that we have left ajar. In her states of ephemeral grace, the table is set, but nothing is finished, and everything is still possible.

Ben Heywood 2017